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Sunglasses: Protect Your Peepers

June brings with it, not only the first day of summer, but also National Sunglasses Day (6/27). In keeping with these two annual milestones, let’s chat about the importance of wearing sunglasses! Many people simply think of sunglasses as a summertime fashion accessory but don’t stop to consider the benefits of wearing the proper sunglasses or the dangers associated with leaving your eyes unprotected.

As you look for the perfect pair of shades, it’s important to remember that all sunglasses are not created with the same technology or ultraviolet protection. The sun’s rays, when unfiltered, can be quite harmful to the human eye. Thus, it is important to consider the percentage of damaging radiation that the sunglasses block. Ideally, you’re looking for a lens that will block 100 percent of both UV-A and UV-B radiation. This goes hand in hand with the next point to consider: coverage.

You want to be sure you are selecting sunglasses that offer plenty of eye and facial coverage, fitting your face shape or specific activity for which they will be used. This will ensure that minimal amounts of harmful radiation reach your eye, and that the tender skin around your eyes is protected. Proper coverage, along with a UV-filtering lens, can reduce the chances of skin cancer developing here. Those with light-colored eyes are even more susceptible. So, whether you’re planning on wearing the sunglasses every day or for a specific activity like running, hopping on the bike, or working in the garden, coverage is important!

We’ve all seen them: impulse-buy-sunglasses at the checkout counter, likely at your local convenience store or gas station. While these may seem like a quick solution to protect your eyes in a pinch, they could actually be doing you more harm than good. These sunglasses likely do not have proper UV-filtration technology, are often not polarized*, and are certainly not fitted to you by an optical professional to determine coverage. These sunglasses tend to simply shade the eye, still letting in that harmful radiation and glare.

*Polarization: the process by which a lens filters horizontal glare before it reaches the eye. This could come from the surface of water, a wet road, or a dew-covered golf course in the morning! 

Summer is here, and we at Newberry Vision Center want to make sure you have the proper eyewear to keep your eyes safe while you have fun in the sun — and look great doing it! Schedule an appointment with us today at our McKinney office, and we look forward to seeing you soon!

 

Why You Regularly Need to Replace Your Sunglasses

Did you know that sunglasses, or at least sunglass lenses, regularly need to be replaced? 

According to a study conducted at the University of São Paulo, the UV protection that sunglasses provide deteriorates over time. You may adore your current ones, but if you’ve been rocking those shades for two or more years, it might be time to get a new pair. 

In addition to the UV-blocking properties, anti-reflective and anti-scratch coatings wear down, and the frame material may become brittle over the years, too. Even if you have the most durable sunglasses available, regular lens-replacement is the best way to ensure that your vision is maximally protected from the harmful effects of ultraviolet light. 

UV Light and Sunglasses

The protective efficacy of your sunglasses comes in large part from the lens coating of dyes and pigments that reflect and absorb ultraviolet radiation. They create a barrier that prevents UV radiation from penetrating your eyes.

However, this protective coating can, and often does, break down over time. Wear and tear can cause an invisible web of tiny abrasions, compromising its UV-blocking power. Furthermore, the protective dyes and pigments aren’t able to absorb UV rays indefinitely; the more sunlight they’re exposed to, the more rapidly they’ll become ineffective. 

A pair of shades worn on occasion and in mild conditions is likely to remain effective longer than a pair that is heavily used in a more intensely sunny environment. For example, if you spend long days on the water paddling, kayaking, or canoeing, the protective coating on your lenses will deteriorate more quickly than it would if you only wear your shades to go grocery shopping or sit in a cafe. 

Why It’s Important to Protect Your Eyes From UV

Protecting your eyes from the sun is critical no matter where in the world you are, as UV exposure places you at risk for developing eye diseases like eye cancer, pterygium, and pinguecula — which can result in disfigurement and discomfort — as well as cataracts and macular degeneration — which cause vision loss and, in severe cases, blindness.

Even short-term overexposure can result in photokeratitis, a corneal sunburn. Symptoms include eye pain, swelling, light sensitivity, and temporary vision loss. Some people experience it when spending too much time boating or skiing without wearing eye protection. Snow and water can increase solar exposure because they reflect sunlight toward your face.  

What to Look for When Getting New Sunglasses

When choosing new sunglasses, make sure they’re labeled 100% UV protection or UV400. Although most pairs sold in the United States and Canada offer this degree of protection, it’s still worth confirming before making the purchase. Keep in mind that factors like cost, polarization, lens color, or darkness don’t have much to do with the level of UV protection. Even clear prescription lenses can be UV protective. 

It’s important to note that there is a lot of counterfeit sunwear in the marketplace. This is dangerous since counterfeit eyewear may not provide much-needed ultraviolet protection. So if the price of a renowned brand is too good to be true, it’s probably a fake. 

The size and fit of the sunglasses is important. Bigger is definitely better if you spend a lot of time outdoors. Larger wrap-around eyewear is best if you regularly ski or spend many hours in the water, as this style blocks light from all directions. 

To find out whether it’s still safe to wear your favorite shades, visit a McKinney eye doctor to determine whether your lenses still offer the right level of UV protection. It’s also a good opportunity to discuss prescription sunwear. 

For more information about UV safety, or to get the perfect sunglasses tailored to your vision needs and lifestyle, contact Newberry Vision Center in McKinney today!  

 

References 

https://biomedical-engineering-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12938-016-0209-7